6 Reasons to Visit Central Washington State

It’s not uncommon to hear people say that they’ve overlooked North Central Washington State in favor of the more tourism-oriented side of the Pacific Northwest. However, for the few wanderers who have traveled these greener patches, the north-central part of the state is a delight that calls for more. From prehistoric caves to glaciers and natural mineral lakes, there is an abundance of sight for you and your family to discover.

Although we understand that finances might be tight, you can always rely on penny-saving advice or even bookkeeping services to keep your spending in check. While there is a certain degree of effort needed on your behalf, there are at least six reasons for which you’ll want to put aside some hard-earned cash and visit North Central Washington State.

#1 Glacier Village

glacier village

Right outside of the Mt. Baker–Snoqualmie National Forest boundary lies the canyon village of Glacier, a stunning and vibrant display of what nature has to offer. Take a bound to the increasingly steep-walled canyon mountains, and surround yourself with the beauty of the emerald green forest.

The village of Glacier passes the 170-foot-high Nooksack Falls, which are about 5 miles east of it, afterward traveling up the north fork of the Nooksack. Once there you will be greeted by a multi-colored rainbow of wildflowers during the summer, and don’t forget about the huckleberry patches either.

#2 The Bull Statue

What has become the staple fixture of downtown Ellensburg wasn’t always as well-loved by its citizens as it is today. Constructed by the late artist Richard Beyer, the Bull Statue proudly stands as a piece of history dating back to the 1980s. Once upon a time, the fixture sparked over 80 letters of disappointment over concerns about the original name of the construction. You see, back then the piece was titled “The Cowboy”; however, the town folk wasn’t overly impressed by the anatomical correctness of the animal. As a result, they didn’t want to have it displayed at Rotary Pavilion.

Nonetheless, today people from all over the country take and share photographs of themselves and their families joined by the Bull Statue, and you might even be surprised to know that the fixture has its own Facebook fan page.

#3 Lenore Lake Caves

Hiking is becoming increasingly popular in the United States, and for a beginner, Lenore Lake Caves is an excellent start prior to future ventures. The hike to this exciting place, where you can explore the lower Grand Coulee, is relatively short-lived. However, the trail is kept in tip-top shape, and the exploration can reveal the seven ancient huts that were used as an essential shelter area back in the prehistoric era.

If you’re wondering about the fascinating formation of the caves, the Missoula Ice Age Floods plucked huge chunks of basalt from the walls, forming these cave-like locations. Nonetheless, there is something geographically one-of-a-kind to this area rather than others. The solace of their position, along with the easiness with which you can complete the trail (one mile-and-a-half long) make the Lenore Lake Caves a must.

#4 The Stehekin Community

Should you be looking for a secluded valley which can inspire your next book, or should you want to revel in the serenity offered by this part of nature, Stehekin is a sight to behold. Renowned as one of the most stunning valleys the North has to offer, the place used to be a homestead for people during the late 19th century.

A noteworthy mention is that the scenic location is not a town in the real sense of the word, but instead a small retired community which lives outside the conventional path we nowadays adopt. Accessible by trail, floatplane, or even boat, this hidden oasis hosts about a hundred residents all year-round.

When it comes to savoring the wilderness, this is the place you’d like to do it in. If you also want to cut contact with traditional ways of living, you have come to the right place once more. Although there are periodic communications with the “outside world,” including a dozen cars and boat delivered supplies, life in Stehekin is simple and quiet. In fact, even during busy summer seasons days, a mere 200 people will fill this idyllic location.

#5 Gorge Amphitheatre

Renowned as one of the most striking concert areas in the world, the Gorge Amphitheatre is an outdoor sensation that most US residents have heard about. Cleverly positioned above the Columbia River in the small town of George, the stunning amphitheatre can host up to 20.000 people.

This might explain why the location has been used as the playground for some of the biggest names in the history of music, including the Police and others. Of course, if the hippie way is amiss nowadays, you can resurrect it by camping at the amphitheatre and remembering your wild and exciting youth!

#6 White Pass Scenic Byway

whitepass

Stretching over a 46-mile road, White Pass Scenic Byway is, as the name suggests, a picturesque display of what the central part of Washington State has to offer. Taking you through the breath-taking part of Cascade Mountains, White Pass Byway will impress you and other travelers through the majestic element of the expansive mountain view, the jagged rocks across them, and the swirl of the trees as the wind touches each branch.

Top that with the rich-green forests and the crystal-blue lakes, and you are in for one of the most relaxing and pastoral fields you will ever encounter in your life.

The best thing: there’s a lot to do during your trip, ranging from fishing, camping, playing sports, exploring the nature and its flowers, bird watching, hiking, and other recreations of your choice. This is not only a journey which should be made by adults. In fact, it’s a unique display of what we should appreciate in our beautiful country, whether we want to trail the adventure or whether we merely want to enjoy a picture-perfect drive.

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